Posts Taged programming

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AWS Summerian, contextualized in what smartphones tech is concerned

In a previous post, we mentioned that AR technology relates to next-gen mobile phones. Due to the fact that for these devices, VR technology is considered less suitable, the development of AR applications should be the key for future success.

In this context, Amazon’s cloud division (AWS) launched a new Amazon platform, the Amazon Summerian, supporting the rapid development of AR, VR, and 3D applications without the need for sophisticated coding skills. Available in a preview version, the new service is browser-based and benefits at this stage by a considerable push from the company, who wants to accelerate its adoption by the developers.

Integrated, easy-to-use tools should tip the market

Mass-coding is a dream many have when anticipating the future. Being able to have at hand an average employee that is basically skilled in coding, and pairing this type of professional with easy-to-use developer software could serve in a rapid implementation of various concepts at a global scale. Of course, this dream is also cost-saving, as well as perhaps a bit offensive from the point of view of an old school programmer.

Attempts of materializing this idea are already in motion – from introducing coding as a new language in the school’s curriculum, to making various coding apps available, so that kids are familiarized from an early age with this activity.

The other side of the coin consists of the easy-to-use tools designed for developers. When backed by tech leaders, these tools are bound to have a meaningful impact on the market.

High expectations, more exigent customers

 

Amazon, in order to present its product, conveyed the following statement to the public, through the voice of Marco Argenti, the Vice President of Technology at AWS: “With Amazon Sumerian, it is now possible for any developer to create a realistic, interactive VR or AR application in a few hours.”

This raises quite a few questions, related to the possible variables – does this estimate concern low-skilled or high-skilled developers? Is this an accurate expectation to create, or is it just a marketing move?

Some of these questions have answers, while for others, we still need neutral feedback. For example, the same FirstPost article mentions how the developers “need no specific experience in AR or VR programming”, but also that the company is “working on integrating third-party developers with the services to add more features”. So the platform is partly work-in-progress.

While the customers are increasingly demanding, the specific market includes an extended array of developer tools, as you may see here, some open source, others selling for quite reasonable prices, depending on the budget.

Trendsetters will be trendsetters

 

There’s nothing like good, powerful support coming from an established source that is willing to push a product on the market. All its qualities are underlined and turned into selling points, while the sore points are remedied or in view for remediation.

From this angle, a product coming from Amazon, Google (another company investing in the same area), Microsoft or others manage to equal similar, more competitive products, who do not benefit from the backup of the huge promotion/selling mechanisms these companies have. This market gap (more like a publicizing means gap) is supposedly here to stay, because it determines smaller developers to cooperate with the bigger companies more willingly, in order to join forces.

That is why even the small moves in the market, when coming from huge tech companies, are relevant. They help in anticipating future trends. Their small moves are doubled by ample investments, and these companies are likely to shift entire markets for their estimated ROI. Others may benefit, too, in the process. Customers most certainly benefit from the fierce competition – and so do the smaller companies that are clever enough to take the pulse of the market.