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Canvy MWC 2018

February unleashes MWC 2018, and the mobile brands are set to amaze us once more

…or at least that’s what the public expects from the 900+ exhibitors (as listed here).

The dedicated online media already started covering this focal topic, and the latest developments are yet to come. You can browse the latest TechCrunch feature on what to look forward to at this year’s edition of the Mobile World Congress or search for the specific string of news as covered by your favorite online publication. You probably won’t be disappointed.


What caught our eye about this year’s MWC

On a short browsing session today we’ve noticed how LG’s Vision AI managed to make the trending news. Well, tbh, some of the members of our team do have a soft spot for the latest generation LG products. Nevertheless, the fact that a suite of AI technologies aiming to conquer the hearts of mobile fans is really raising an interest illustrates that the market has a certain amount of expectations in this direction. Regardless of the brand, the company that will genuinely be capable of answering these expectations gets the benefit of breaking the ice. Of course, the functionalities should be extremely practical or even truly amazing, otherwise we are back to the late 70s almanac effect.

What we mean to say with this is that progress is a fickle thing. Prototypes and projective stories on progress are one thing, while the viable commercial products and the feel of the materialized concepts can easily disappoint. The market hunger for truly impressive technologies does not make for the said technologies.

Now, the features prepared by LG, as introduced here do not seem as exciting as one would have thought. While AI’s possibilities are infinite, using them to recommend the best photo shooting mode or to voice-control the smartphone seems way under the expectations.


Other brands also hint at a couple of potentially interesting unveiling-s

Launching a new wireless charger, coming up with a new, improved DeX and presenting the Galaxy S9 and S9+ flagships should be alluring enough for Samsung’s fans. You may explore more details on this topic here.

IDEMIA made a few waves with its Augmented Identity solutions. The target audience here is industry level, and the main concerned areas would be the Financial, Telecom, Identity, Public Security and IoT.

Huawei keeps its followers busy with developments on the 5G line of action, and places its AI bets in the cloud, more precisely its All-Cloud intelligent networks infrastructure.

Of course, the novelties will have in mind various areas and different financial possibilities – for example Archos will showcase 3 budget phones. The thing is not without importance, since the idea of ubiquitous Internet is still on the table, and this means all individuals should afford Internet access, be it on a budget device or on a high-end one.

Between promises and delivery

Since it’s already been a couple of years since the tech companies circulate bold concepts in the context of the IoT, and in general, of the new tech conjecture, we may well notice the way things look a bit toned down. This is partly due to the fact that these bold concepts have had time to fail, or simply not deliver. Once this happened with flexible phones, transparent screens or smart glasses, the enthusiasm that surrounded the possible materialization of these bright ideas is bound to lose some of its oomph.

This does not automatically mean the tech bubble is deflating. It just stands to show the environment is perhaps maturing, and the viable ideas separate themselves from the less possible ones. We’ll just have to see what real surprises tech brands do have in store for their customers.



Canvy Intel news Vaunt

Is the smartest design inconspicuous? Intel seems to think so

You must have surely heard by now of the smart glasses’ odyssey. The wearable computer glasses have gone through a few versions – and the issue of comfort shared an equal part with the tech issue, in what keeping the product from mass commercialization is concerned.

The most well-known attempt comes from Google. The Google Glass went through several proofs of concept (PoC), then it became the Aura Project, aiming niche markets (healthcare, corporate). It gradually faded out of the limelight.

The entire experience prompted out that unusual, uncomfortable head gear cannot lead to success. VR headsets represent a similar case.


Intel’s attempt to turn the tables

Intel decided to avoid making the same mistakes as mentioned above. Their smart glasses look inconspicuous, according to online media reports. The prototype is called Vaunt, and allegedly mimics the usual pair of plastic glasses one may find at any optometrist.

The Vaunt can reflect holographic images on the user’s retina, include Bluetooth connectivity, and are able to send discreet notifications to their user. The matter of contextual, integrated notification is one focal point of this new piece of technology, whilst the software that backs it up remains a secret for the moment.

While Slate underlines the possible connection between Intel’s negative chipset security flaws attention and this new gadget – as in suggesting that the company may have used this project to distract people from the less flattering question of flawed chipsets, the product is nevertheless interesting.

Regardless of whether Intel will decide to commercialize the Vault or not, it sure has set a precedent.


What if the bold new technology were inconspicuous?

Let’s imagine the tech gear of the future looking just as our current objects look like, only having an advanced tech twist hidden beneath a normal looking surface.

This would surely be another way to go, in opposition with in-your-eyes technology, making a loud statement that it should prevail in our lives.

An IoT-connected, highly automatized household could, for example, look just like any other house, unraveling its technological potential only per request.

We could integrate efficient technology in a completely environment-friendly landscape, aiming for health, visually-pleasing greenery and sustainability.

Of course, the degree of maturity involved in taking such an approach is way higher than the actual stage of societal progress seems to involve. But we can always remain optimistic.

If by the time we’ve grown out of the tech-enthusiasts’ adolescence we are basking in, there will be enough of a planet for us to steer back towards an eco-compatible environment, inconspicuous technology might be the only way to go.

In the meantime, you may take a look at the Vaunt, on this Verge hands-on video:

net neutrality FCC vote Canvy contact app news

The day the Internet held its breath…

We touched base with the Internet neutrality topic back in September, when we considered ISP blocking and what it means. We also mentioned the fight to keep the digital online space as we all know it on our Facebook page. Now all these are about to unravel, once the FCC vote takes place.


The global campaign against the vote that might bend net neutrality

The taglines read “it’s time to break the internet” – and influential groups and people call for resistance. Perhaps it seems hard to grasp the full importance of this step – yet those who know better are willing to explain it over and over again. Transforming the online space into a fragmented, multi-lane environment is bad. And once the precedent will be created, this will ripple into global effects. So yes, it concerns every net user in every corner of the world.

The Open Letter addressed to the U. S. Senate Subcommittee comprises a 43 page comment that details all the flaws in the upcoming action, as well as tries to deconstruct the false argumentation employed in supporting ISP manipulation, or, in other words, to present it as a thing that is already taking place, thus minimizing the effects of the impending vote.

“Don’t repeal net neutrality” and “you don’t understand how the Internet works” – here’s some of the most powerful allegations pertaining to the massive campaign that supports net neutrality. Striking mockup illustrations (as the one we captioned) try to make it clear to people how the Internet will look like if the act passes.


What can you do?

First, get informed in due time. You still have the liberty to do it – search for your preferred online authors and see what they have to say. Google the matter – browse articles, scan the arguments. Discuss what you discover, exchange ideas, become aware of what it’s going on and of the impact of these events.

In short, what could happen is that “the proposal would undo regulations that prohibit broadband and wireless companies from slowing or blocking access to the internet and banning them from charging internet companies fees to reach their customers faster than competitors”, as CNET explains it.

Secondly, check pages such as this, in order to see how you can help. Express your presence while it still matters.

Hoping to post again in an environment where the online looks the same, and it’s not shredded into multiple pieces with different regimens.

Canvy Facebook messenger for kids

Social media market enlargement – as reflected in Messenger for kids

We seem to be hearing a lot about technology use among seniors and/or social media for the elderly. Of course, this is just one side of the audience spectrum, while the other consists of the young(est) audience. Both segments are potential sources for a demographic market enlargement, as they provide constant technology and social media users, currently embedded in the overall audience.

Targeting these categories separately would surely be a profitable move – but is it also a common sense decision?


Quick case study of the Messenger for kids situation

The Facebook Messenger App for kids is designed for “kids 6-12 to connect with their family and friends, with parental controls to ensure they do so safely. It includes real-time video chat with AR effects for more fun!” – see more details here.

But why the fragmentation? Of course, as a contact management app, we may easily say that the more social media channels, the better. This means that people have an increasingly acute need to centralize various messages incoming on different channels, much to their exasperation. As long as the main channels are integrable at a policy level, as well as at a technical level, their fragmentation provides for the thriving of contact management apps.

However the question remains – why go for fragmentation, as a social media company? The messenger for kids seem to be packing in Snapchat-esque features and a hybrid type of parental control, where Facebook vouches for parental approved content circulating between the kids, yet the parents cannot see the chats. At least that’s what we gathered from a brief browsing of this topic.

The audience would consist of the kids that already use the full Messenger (doubtfully, since going for a lesser, more childish version is frankly a no-no), and the kids that would use the full Messenger, but aren’t allowed to. So it would be parent-approved, Facebook-supervised tool. The dream of every 6-12 child that yearns for digital communications.


How about the elderly?

Imagining a symmetrical move to the other side of the audience spectrum, the elderly should get their own Facebook or Messenger, where they could… I don’t know, exchange nostalgia messages, apply retro filters, play Bingo or have other “specific” activities.

Isn’t it weird how we stand united in separation? Why split the audience (besides dreams of, no, not of sugar plums, but of profit), and this after a century long experience that people do not like to do as they are told?

The elderly do, generally, have more time on their hands, compared to how their schedule looked like one or two decades ago. But they are also re-enjoying life as it is, with fresh air in the morning, with telling stories to their grandsons, with having tea with friends and real-time gossiping. In fact, they are a fickle audience when it comes to social media, because they might just be wiser and more real in their options than the younger adults are.

Welcoming them on social media could mean embedding extra options into the already-existing apps. Or, yet again, it may translate into a lot of fuss, market studies, extra apps or customized apps. Which one do you think it would be the best?


Market enlargement done right

Yes, there are audience segments that could use some extra attention and custom-tailored options.

Yes, by stimulating these people to be more active on social media, the specific market would most likely increase its dynamism and in fact would stand an “enlargement” process.

But adding extra apps in the already crowded digital landscape is counter-intuitive. Competitors have to stand together in the same niche, yet two and more apps from the same brand, due to, well, different targeting, is just too much.

Supplementary fragmentation leads to annoyance and confusion. Friends, business contacts, family and peers would be ultimately spread out among an indefinite number of social media applications, randomly open and shut, each one beaconing their notifications, each one difficult to configure, mute and so on.

Why not put users in control – for real? Allow the existing apps to be refined in a way that would meet specific needs. Kids – load preset configuration number 1! Elderly – load and customize preset configuration number 3!

Wonder if that is actually technically possible – but what isn’t, nowadays?


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Where does “organic” stop and “sponsored” come in – a short Canvy Team review

As you may already be aware, Mozilla switched back to Google as the default search engine for Firefox in in the U.S., Canada, Hong Kong and Taiwan. The news implies that Google paid quite a considerable amount of money for this move, but it does not mention the exact value, since the “Google spokeswoman… declined to comment further”.

This is an example of how the things we take for granted when using digital tools are in fact mere results of deals, negotiations and big investments. So, what else is new, right? Not new, but rather the result of dwelling on the same idea: our satisfaction or annoyance related to all things tech-related is in fact attributable to such large scale moves. Of course, customers have their own options to make, but we only choose from the available “spread” – and what makes some variants available or not is in the hands of leading-edge tech companies, based on analytics and market considerations.


Organic versus sponsored/paid

The digital data we are exposed to is organic, unless labeled otherwise. However, even this commonly considered organic data may in fact have had to go through various funnels and the selection or boosting systems before reaching the average user, which makes it only partially organic.

To come back to the above news, when we employ a certain search engine, we take on all its predetermined terms and conditions. True, we get a lot of valuable free access to information, as well as other perks, in exchange for this. But those who are trying to reach us as users have to abide by the rules and conditions of the search engine – and sometimes their information fails to reach us. We don’t choose from a pool of infinite data, we only select from a bunch of preselected one. With all the AI algorithms, the selection itself got modified, to an extend that in fact it is not us who makes the choice, but an average individual located roughly in the same area as us, having approximately the same age, gender, preoccupations and so on.

Organic search results therefore are a myth. At the opposite end of the spectrum, we have the data labeled as promoted, paid for, sponsored etc. It’s the upfront marketing data, placed in an area where the smaller players in various fields compete for the attention of the oh-so-powerful-yet-many-times-unaware-of-its-importance-and-value, the (potential) customer.


Getting more comfortable in our role

As a formerly living in a rural area person who moved to the city becomes used to the point of being dependent to the modern urban commodities, the mighty world wide web users become more and more attached to great visuals, efficient services, fast query results and brand relevance. We have stopped questioning the “results” long ago – are they organic or are they paid for? The degree of gullibility just showed its amplitude in the fake news issue.

Is this a good or bad thing? Perhaps it isn’t even a duality question. However, it is a common sense principle that one shouldn’t completely rely on something barely understood. Right, but we do need everything digital every day, more and more – it’s a mass thing.

Even though we keep on using all the wonderful digital tools, both software and hardware included, being inquisitive and aware is a must. Let’s not get so comfortable, lest it will act against our own good.

Consider this: you go out and have a great meal with your friends, somewhere locally. You come back home and you search for the place online, eager to recommend it to someone. You forgot the name. It’s not the type of place that’s word of the mouth. You type, let’s say “pub great ribs wide variety beer”. And the results don’t point to the exact place you’re having in mind. Yet they do have a web page, and they have presented their offer properly on that page. What is going on? The entire labyrinth of moderated search is put in motion, but this specific business cannot reach you – it got lost somewhere in its entrails.


The bottom line

As a business, learn how to master the mechanisms that allow you to be visible to your audience and reach out to them.

As a customer/user never forget that often the digital environment serves you the most optimized results, not the organic results per se, nor necessarily what you really had in mind when you hit enter, or what is best suited for you, as a unique individual. Keep searching – combine offline with online and whenever needed, make your voice heard. Customer feedback matters even in cold, mathematical algorithms, and will count in decision making. We are still shaping the world as humans, we just have to be more on the ball as before.

CANVY, Facebook, messenger, payments, news

Social Media Communication, a significant new threshold, in the Canvy Team’s opinion

Digital communication evolved from standard, more formal means, towards friendly, viral tools. The “why” is rather a no-brainer. It did so because it followed the mass of people that crowded the most intuitive, friendly and progressive networks.

We are now experiencing communications that recreate in the cyber medium the vibe of face-to-face discussions, as much as possible. We send smileys, we generously impart GiFs, memes, photos, audio sequences and generally, we mimic real meetings with a combination of digital signs and feeling conveyors.


The next level of interactions is here

Social Media imitated real social interactions, bringing in gradually more tools of success in its attempt. But it all has a commercial underline, which is not contradictory to the first statement here, because society too has commercial nuances – some might even say highly intensive commercials tones, not just nuances.

Therefore Social Media opened up into messaging networks, which in turn opened up to peer-to-peer payments.

Say what and where – you might ask. “Payments in Messenger comes to France and the UK”, titles AndroidHeadlines.

The initiative is bound to be one of impact. In any case, it is very interesting to follow the developments, no matter that we root for it, or on the contrary, we would rather remain conservative in our payment options.

The feature is intended for friends transferring money to each other, but it might be just the first step. Depending on how this capability will be received, perhaps Facebook will extend it for other purposes, too.

You may find out more about the necessary steps and the security guarantees in the source article.


Monetization, comfort and emotions

It is only logical that many of the great digital tools count on users getting familiarized with their features, then becoming almost addicted to them, to a degree where even changes towards monetization don’t bother them.

Due to the fact that a certain such product proves useful and dependent, one would be willing to pay for extra features, or even for upgrading older features.

Facebook keeps many of its attractive features in the freebie zone, be its main social network or the more recent Messenger. Changes may revolt users, but they still remain enlisted. Of course, there also is such a thing as the straw that broke the camel’s back, but this network seems to be attentive enough to avoid it.

Instead, going with the flow, as you can see, the company decided to dip its toes into the payment market waters. Do you think this is a successful move or not?

918 gggl phone

Trends that caught our attention: Google Pixel 2 news and DNA nanobots

While recovering from a local storm that managed to wreak havoc on the city here, we couldn’t help but browsing the bigger picture trending subjects – in the tech field, which is always a matter of interest here, at the Canvy Team.


Gogle Pixel 2 launch confirmed

With a timing that managed to out-trend even the iPhone X post-launch comments (at least in the USA), Google confirmed its October 4th event marking the launch of Pixel 2.

This high-end device competes in the premium segment. The additional Google-related rumors are that the company will replace the defective Nexus 6P with Pixel XL-s, even if the one year warranty term id overdue.

The price for the expected Pixel 2 remains yet to be announced, as well as the validity of the second piece of (unofficial) news.


DNA nanobots

On the healthcare-oriented side of next-gen technology, the Caltech researchers managed to make quite a few waves by reviving the idea of microscopic DNA robots set to intervene in favor of the human health by transporting molecules to specific places in the body. This time the robots evolved into a more feasible concept – the specialists speak of “pegs” that would enable the tiny robots to advance their way towards their destination inside the body.

However, as the source article mentions, “there’s a lot of work that needs to be done in order to perfect the technology and understand how the robots could work in a wider variety of situations”, a detail that might temper the enthusiasm, but nevertheless does not impair the fact that the scientists advance on their way to materializing the prototypes.


Conclusion in G minor

…Where G can either stand for Google – a brand definitely on top of the digital trends, or you can also look at the trending topics on (again!) Google, and see how G may stand for “games”, a subject that takes at least one of the top places weekly. This may be construed positively (people will always keep their playful nature), or negatively (all this tech primarily serves the gaming field, while other domains are not as appreciated). In fact, the balanced conclusion is nor here nor there.

Modern technology empowered customers like never before – in terms of making choices of high impact. Ultimately, the playfulness or seriousness of any tech product translates not into moral conclusions, but into profitability metrics. The most world saving concept can populate a dusty file if not approached and supported accordingly. Similarly, the video games industry is thriving due to the fact that it manages to captivate people of all ages.

On this note, we leave you to another week of tech discoveries, and we invite you once again to explore Canvy’s full array of features, as you might find things that you’ve missed before. Our Android contact manager app is pretty complex, and we welcome your feedback at out contact addresses!

Canvy, Canvy Team, smartphones, Android Oreo

Android Oreo – what about the smartphones that are not scheduled to update

The fast-paced technology of our days may sometimes feel frustrating. We tend to form bonds with our possessions, especially when their daily use proves satisfactory. Therefore smartphones cross the boundary between indifferent objects and cherished goods. Many appreciate the new, improved devices, yet still hold on to their older ones – it’s an element of comfort. It may also be an action of wise financial considerations or sustainability.

Regardless of the reason, a lot of people desire to keep their current devices, yet would like to benefit from the latest software updates. Depending on the tech leaders’ policies, this may or may not be possible. What else is there to do, besides giving up your older smartphone and getting a new one just because you want the latest OS features and access to the newest apps?


Android Oreo and smartphone obsolescence

Unveiled on the 21st of August this year, the latest Android version was confirmed to arrive preinstalled on smartphones such as “BlackBerry, HTC, Nokia and Sony”, as GhizmoChina confirms (also see here the list of devices that get the new OS).

The logical assumption is that older smartphone versions will not get the Oreo update.

The same publication mentions that, however, those who really wish to have the latest Android version working on their current smartphones can employ custom ROMS and install Oreo. This “solution” is highly questionable, due to its instability and unofficial character – so if you are thinking of it, better move past it.


The hardware-software hybrid comes with its own rules

Whenever we acquire a “bundle” made out of hardware and software, we should understand that this type of property is not autonomous, especially in a world of connectivity. The benefits are many, but the rules are very specific ones we must abide to.

Perhaps the digital generations find it hard to even examine this issue in terms of autonomy versus dependency, but the services’ merging that we are witnessing do cause this type of interlocking for various elements, paid or free.

We buy a smartphone – it comes with a preinstalled OS that is part of our decision process when we decide to make this purchase. We install various apps, some of them free – in many instances because we want to connect and our friends and peers are reachable on those particular networks represented by the apps. Or we simply extend our abilities via the apps and we make our activities easier.

From the get go, the quality of digital user will suffer the impact of various factors.


Is the customer a false or a true king?

The idiom “the customer is always king” knows a radical transformation in the digital age. On the one hand, the companies do pay attention to the way users react to their product and services and analyze the market before every change – the slightest annoyance can snowball into a worldwide phenomenon or at least has the potential to impact a brand’s image. Therefore, risk management includes the customer reaction as one of the most important factors.

One the other hand, some changes need to go through, no matter what. As we know, innovations are rarely able to guarantee public approval before they launch – so they need to be introduced, they hold risks and often meet the audience’s hostility.

Of course, not everything comes in A/B tests. Some changes that seem to be pre-approved by the customers go wrong when standing the reality trial, while some innovations prove winners, regardless of the first impact.

The idea here would be that, when considering smartphones and the related software, be it their OS or their apps, any major change turns into a global roll out. When the change implies modifications that we do not like, unwanted updates, or even replacing our smartphones for compatibility – we hardly feel like kings.


Enjoy what you have

The good part is that old sayings never go out of business – and the ones about enjoying what you have are the golden rule when in doubt about changes that you are not sure of. Ponder your options – you have the time since usually there is a lag between the new and the old, in the sense that you are able to keep your old options/devices and not be completely out-networked for a while.

The same advice should go to the companies, as well. The truth is that customers appreciate not being pushed into unwanted options, or being left behind because they choose to do things differently. The ethics, the customer-friendliness and the customer loyalty are perhaps harder to quantify, but extremely valuable. When introducing innovations, it would be nice to let them exist along classical options, instead of annihilating these last ones. Just saying… at least when there is enough room for both to coexist.

Canvy Team, apps, communications, WhatsApp, Snapchat, file sharing

When apps redefine communications – Canvy Team latest news recap

Although the modern communications market is still fragmented, the main communication channels and apps “own” certain features. Meaning that, even if successful features tend to spread via imitation or innovative answers within different apps, the audience tends to keep associating them with the brands that introduced or perfected them.

Some may wonder what else is new in digital communications. Well, the main established players in this market have found out once again that it’s the details that matter. Intuitive UI, friendly logos, tiny features that hold the potential of great impact may all be essential at the end of the day, as seasoning is for a great dish.


A successful app now allows sending any type of file

Loyal users everywhere are thrilled – and for a good reason. WhatsApp experiments these days with a feature that allows users to send other files than photos. The accepted files may be as large as 128 MB for iOS, 100 MB for Android and 64 MB for a Web client.

This new feature illustrates the way modern communications widen their range – why go out of the app, in order to send specific files via a different channel?

Well, the question above is not just rhetorical. We already have some critical voices that warn of the potential risks in this new WhatsApp capability. Some files may be malicious, or may carry items that in fact are not legally share-able. In other words, it seems that the difficulty of file-sharing in our day and age is not random. There are important cyber-security considerations involved, as well as legal considerations.

But why spoil the WhatsApp experiment by contemplating the difficulties involved? Most likely, if this feature proves successful, the company will mitigate the risks.


Tracking people on the map – a superpower of yet another communication app

No need to hold your breath or start guessing – we are talking about Snapchat. The instant fun, amazingly simple app now allows friends to see each other’s location. This new tool is bound to change the rules of the game a bit – since it basically introduces a tracking feature. See here more on this topic.

As we may see by looking at the bigger picture, both of these recent pieces of news illustrate how the communications apps compete for the fragmented market we mentioned above. Yet the more attractive these new features are, the riskier they might be – in turn.

What is your opinion on this attractiveness vs. privacy topic? Did you have any incidents involving modern communications risks? Are you concerned about the implications of sharing sensitive files via certain communications channels or not?

Let’s remember…

…how there is an intended line between work/office communications and private messaging. Yet the obsolete look and features of some work-destined communication channels results in employees doubling the way they communicate among themselves by employing the mainstream, private-targeted apps. Therefore, the idea that your staff is using more secure channels in order to communicate work-related details might just prove a utopia. These tools are all efficiency-dependent. When they fail to meet the users’ expectancy in terms of speed, responsiveness and friendliness, they end up being rapidly replaced by the next app in line.

Finally, although it may sound like an old Hallmark card, modern communications, in fact, are all about sharing and receiving. Without letting some of your digital persona be seen, these virtual communities would be an extremely boring place. The communications landscape is made out of the few from the many, combined with the more from its “stars” – people who enjoy the spotlight and have found the answer to their dreams in the way modern people communicate – text, photos, file-sharing and all.

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Who else is redesigning their communication app? – Canvy Team -selected tech news

Hello to all our readers! While browsing through last week’s notable news, we decided to see the details of a couple of MFST announcements. One of them in particular is of interest for us at this moment – and we will unveil our main reason later on in this post.

Microsoft and its spotlight news – hardware

First, let’s take a look at a couple of hardware news.

The company managed to keep their audience engaged last week, with its new lineup of Surface devices. You may see here a 60 second cut of a new dedicated ad. Not every rumor about these devices is positive, though: Forbes highlights the unpleasant “lack of repairability” characterizing the 2017 Surface Pro laptop, designed in a way that mimics Apple technology – in what the repairing is concerned.

Yet another MFST innovation is the Microsoft Modern Keyboard, featuring a hidden fingerprint sensor. Aiming to make passwords a thing of the past – at least for the users which enjoy biometric authentication, this new keyboard looks and feels a bit MacBook – like, as Daily Mail puts it.

Microsoft recent news – software

It seems we’ve entered a summer for significant updates, upgrades and for refreshing the look of certain applications – a thing we are most interested about.

Pix, the Microsoft camera app on iOS camera app, just took the idea of photo embellishing to a new level (new for Pix, customary for third-party apps that revolved around filters, photo enhancements and style filters – think the Prisma photo editing app, for example).

And last, yet not least, Skype will undergo a major redesign. The company unveiled the new look earlier this month, and we can see how they are going from the specific look towards one more in tone with the appearance of WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger or Snapchat. Is this how the desire to blend in looks like? Or is it that a certain visual aspect of what the communication apps are concerned proved to be the winning formula?

Going from cute to complex and discrete – this is how this move is perceived by some. True as it might be that we go on certain networks to reconnect with friends and discover groups based on interests, common activities or shared values – as adults we all spend a lot of time engaged in professional activities. A certain “attire” slowly works its way into the visual elements we are most attracted to – a nuance of seriousness gains momentum. In other words, although the fun and bright design lures people towards an app, classy visuals do win in the long run.

What do you think about the way certain apps modifies their look or logo? As you may have noticed on Facebook, here at Canvy we are in the process of implementing a major upgrade, looks included. Stay tuned to find out exactly when, and in the meantime, let us know your ideas on this subject at