Posts Taged global-internet-acces

canvy, gamification, games, trending

Is the gamification trend counter-efficient?

While gamification translates as employing “game-based  mechanics,  aesthetics  and  game  thinking  to  engage people,  motivate  action,  promote  learning,  and  solve  problems” (see the 1st hyperlink below), in fields previously characterized by a non-game structures and an overall seriousness, this trend is catching on in the tech world, as well as in education and business.

The gamification hype

“If it’s games they like, let’s give them games” – this seems to be the motto guiding the adoption of game-like structures in various fields. Of course, learning through play it’s a century old truth. But the yesteryear play that allowed youngsters to mimic life and thus enhance and exercise their skills was a full three-dimensional type of exercise. Nowadays we play games that put our imagination within different type of boundaries, whilst greatly remaining different from the reality in which we breathe, live and interact. Furthermore, the gamification that’s been imported into the workplace, education, training or business operations is derived from video games, since this might well be the singular trigger for interest when dealing with the digital generation.

The gamification hype doesn’t ask questions – businesses adopt and employ gamification because it’s trendy and because it delivers short-term results. Once the recipients of gamified products and programs respond to this approach, the psychological downsizes to this process seem to concern almost no one.

Games teach us something, but there is a price

 Of course, there is a wide variety of games, even inside the video game genre. Strategy, fight, survival, creative, click and play, open world and so on, each subgenre implies a different set of rules and develops certain skills and thinking abilities.

There are learning games and there are escapist games. The truth nobody wants to hear is that all games are escapist – we turn our back to immediate reality and immerse ourselves as players in a fantasy world where we live the illusion of our actions being constructive or important. To a certain extent, they are. Games perpetuate a cause and effect dynamic that is not always met by reality, and many players do not concern themselves with the difference between a regulated, enclosed environment and the vastness of reality, nor with the difference of rhythm between a video game and life, where often the slow pace and the effort beneath each action predominate.

Games and gamified processes teach us what they have been destined to teach us. They deliver a simplified, clear experience that stands in opposition with the chaotic way life unravels. Many a time those who have played more games that lived challenging life situations find it hard to process complex situations. The tendency to simplify things and reduce multi-layered situations to their closes flat counterpart does come out of being too familiar with game-based dynamics.

As studies have noted, games perpetuate the winner philosophy – the learning value of failing lacks or is strongly neglected, and thus they promote a distorted perception of the world.

Are we strong enough to remember the rules of the biggest game of all?

To paraphrase Lewis Carroll “life, what is it but a game?” While it may surely be considered so, the rules of this game are partly mysterious and (fortunately) yet elusive. We may wish to simply it all, and make it all more understandable – but it hardly works this way.

Gamification highly serves the technology hype, as well as humanity’s dreams of automation and robotics. Any device stands the possibility of being programmed to understand the rules of a game and apply these rules in order to win. We are already making the first steps to introduce gamification in talent assessment, in education, and companies enthrall their employees by bringing games into the workplace.

We are thus encouraged to remain or to become again kids, eager to express ourselves, to have fun, to go for the immediate advantage.

To go back to literature, perhaps it would be useful to read or re-read Lord of the Flies – in a world of kids, who will be humane, kind and wise?

The biggest game of all has different rules, and it still awaits for us to be adults, mature and to have gained the degree of understanding and knowledge to be able to play it. In life, true victory is a victory for many, not just for one. Winning means turning your opponents around, perhaps changing our own position to meet in the middle. Finding out our purpose, communicating, sharing, feeling that we still have a soul – such are the victories of this intense, dynamic, trying and challenging “game”.

Meanwhile, in Gamelandia…

The online news is topped by game-related news, such as the one about the French start-up Blade bringing their cloud game service to the U.S, or the Mad Catz manufacturers resurfacing soon at CES 2018. Millions hold their breath when reading about their favorite video game latest addition, version or release, in a disproportionate effusion of sentiments.

As an old-fashioned teacher would say “first do your chores, then play”. But at a global level our chores are long forgotten, while our play comes first, or at least its two-dimensional or three-dimensional replica does.

Facebook, global internet acces, Canvy, Canvy Team, Aquila

Global Internet access – latest developments and summary from the Canvy Team

If you are passionate about all tech things, as we are here at Canvy, then you must be aware of Facebook’s attempts to provide global internet access.

 

What does global internet access mean?

Somewhere in January 2017 the planet became aware of its current overall digitization status. More precisely, a global overview powered by We are Social & Hootsuite revealed how more than 50 percent of the world’s population employs Internet connectivity on a regular basis. Or, as the more common expression goes, they are digitally connected.

How does this translate for you? Do you associate a wow moment to this piece of information, or are you slightly perplexed the numbers are not higher?

It probably depends on many factors, such as your location, the social positioning that defines you, your upbringing, your profession and so on. We would venture to say that – if you are reading our blog, you would rather be amazed the number is not higher.

Global internet access would mean a much higher internet connectivity rate – aiming over the 80 percent threshold. But is that possible?

 

Facebook and its quest for Internet connectivity everywhere

Since the big data proves the markets that provide Internet connectivity are way more packed in terms of users (obviously!), the leading tech companies whose global reach depends on ubiquitous connectivity have decided to take things in their hands.

There is a race for global Internet access going on – and it has brought a few things into question.

One of these highlights consists of the special shape taken by this “free Internet” that is in the works. There’s no such thing as a freebie, especially when the backstage involves expensive technology – therefore someone has to sponsor it, or make it profitable in a way. In order to do this, this free internet would be tributary to sponsors, meaning that only certain websites, tools or clusters of information would be available.

And here we go – hello, Internet neutrality dispute! There is an ongoing fight over the way  the Internet would in fact not be the same when made available globally in such a way. Some possible target areas for this type of connectivity have even thought of turning down the possible offer.

 

Social considerations juxtaposed over the need for Internet everywhere

Without global connectivity, there would be no global Internet. No global network, no universal standards, no IoT as the specialists have imagined it. A fragmented network could do, but it will come short of the ideal omni-network some have visualized and also, based their short to medium plans upon.

Due to the fact that social disparities not only plague societies vertically, but also horizontally, it may prove difficult to justify free Internet for some areas in view of their overall low budget, while in other areas the average financial plateau is acceptable, yet this average numbers mark extremes that make the reality different from the figures-based story.

In simpler terms, rural USA areas are as poorly connected as less developed states from the other side of the world are. Yet these rural areas are compensated by the nearby urban conglomerates’ connectivity, hence no free internet eligibility here, whereas less developed states might benefit from a sponsored form of Internet access.

Another issue, that we’ve mentioned above, is the “altered” state of this sponsored free internet connectivity. Check the toll-free data debate.

 

Recent developments – the Facebook drone

That being said – in a nutshell, the leading edge tech companies pursue their global internet connectivity projects – at least its experimental side.

Recently, Facebook’s solar-powered Internet connectivity provider drone, Aquila, successfully completed its test flight in Arizona.

The company intends on developing their drone in such a way that it could be able to fly for months in a row. In fact, the plan is to have a fleet of solar-powered airplanes provide digital connectivity to remote parts of the world.

While a lot of feasibility details have to do with ethics, rules & regulations, the tests proved auspicious. It surely looks like one day we might be able to travel even to the most isolated places, yet benefit from Internet connectivity. Whether it would be the same Internet we know from back home or not, that is – as we’ve seen, a whole different discussion.