Posts Taged facebook

CANVY, Facebook, messenger, payments, news

Social Media Communication, a significant new threshold, in the Canvy Team’s opinion

Digital communication evolved from standard, more formal means, towards friendly, viral tools. The “why” is rather a no-brainer. It did so because it followed the mass of people that crowded the most intuitive, friendly and progressive networks.

We are now experiencing communications that recreate in the cyber medium the vibe of face-to-face discussions, as much as possible. We send smileys, we generously impart GiFs, memes, photos, audio sequences and generally, we mimic real meetings with a combination of digital signs and feeling conveyors.

 

The next level of interactions is here

Social Media imitated real social interactions, bringing in gradually more tools of success in its attempt. But it all has a commercial underline, which is not contradictory to the first statement here, because society too has commercial nuances – some might even say highly intensive commercials tones, not just nuances.

Therefore Social Media opened up into messaging networks, which in turn opened up to peer-to-peer payments.

Say what and where – you might ask. “Payments in Messenger comes to France and the UK”, titles AndroidHeadlines.

The initiative is bound to be one of impact. In any case, it is very interesting to follow the developments, no matter that we root for it, or on the contrary, we would rather remain conservative in our payment options.

The feature is intended for friends transferring money to each other, but it might be just the first step. Depending on how this capability will be received, perhaps Facebook will extend it for other purposes, too.

You may find out more about the necessary steps and the security guarantees in the source article.

 

Monetization, comfort and emotions

It is only logical that many of the great digital tools count on users getting familiarized with their features, then becoming almost addicted to them, to a degree where even changes towards monetization don’t bother them.

Due to the fact that a certain such product proves useful and dependent, one would be willing to pay for extra features, or even for upgrading older features.

Facebook keeps many of its attractive features in the freebie zone, be its main social network or the more recent Messenger. Changes may revolt users, but they still remain enlisted. Of course, there also is such a thing as the straw that broke the camel’s back, but this network seems to be attentive enough to avoid it.

Instead, going with the flow, as you can see, the company decided to dip its toes into the payment market waters. Do you think this is a successful move or not?

821 person-sunglasses-woman-smartphone

What could AR glasses mean for connectivity and communications? – The Canvy Team answer attempt

Recently, a patent application filed by the members of the Oculus R&D division allowed the online media to make a few educated guesses on how this gadget will look like.

You may read more details on this gadget – Facebook’s AR glasses – in this Engadget article. Essentially, the working principle is that of a “waveguide system that projects images and light into the user’s eyes”. The concept is not innovation per se, which means that the materialization should be excellent and in time, in order to stay ahead of its potential competition.

 

Will AR glasses cut their own niche on the market?

…or perhaps they don’t need to, since they might just work out as a handy and/or fancy accessory to smartphones. Here you may check out a 2015 rundown of the alleged such gadgets at the level of 2015. Just a couple of years later, and we still have not witnessed the large-scale success of the products mentioned in this article. Some of them are even a complete novelty for the 2017 reader, which means they have practically fallen off the board.

We have explained in a previous blog post the reason why AR (and not VR) works for the smartphones – therefore the choice of AR over VR comes without saying. The potential market for AR glasses consists of the mass of smartphone owners. Compatible smartphones, of course.

Therefore, all it might take is a working, attractive gadget, good marketing and attractive features – for this new trend to spread virally. There is, however, a fine line between success and flop when it comes to “accessory” gadgets, which might explain the careful way the tech companies proceed. Long planning stages, testing and re-configuring try to avoid the possibility of this type of gadgets being crushed once they “see the light”.

 

What you see might not be what you get

This does not refer to the above-mentioned gadget itself, so you may rest assured the Facebook team is indeed doing their best to produce a great device. The subtitle allegation concerns the target audience, or the market, if you will.

Sociology is the key to marketing success. Of course, nowadays it is itself based on big data parameters, so having access to correctly-processed big data is also a must. Here’s a factual example –let’s say an employed male in his 30 officially owns a smartphone. Although the account shows up in his name, due to the fact that his days are always busy and that he actually predominantly uses his work phone, the data concerning the use of his phone might in fact be generated by an elderly relative or a young one, with access to his phone.

Therefore, when estimating the chances of success on the market of a new device – the predictive capacities, even when automated, are not certitudes per se, even if some companies try to get to that point. There are a lot of smoke screens coming from the way things go in real life.

Sometimes it is hard to find the explanation for why a certain device did not meet its success, or why, on the contrary, the sales practically exploded on the market.

 

Key takeaways from the AR glasses (ongoing) saga

It turns out that when you are keen on an idea, and you also have the financial backup for it, it may be actually wise to go on perfecting it – don’t give up on your dream!

The market gets ripe for certain concepts, although it takes time – so pay attention and strike the iron while it’s hot – timing is important!

Keep your target audience on their toes, without revealing more than necessary, since the competition might be following your moves too.

(Well, some of you might already be extremely familiar with these best practices, but it never hurts to express them once more).

Good luck in your endeavors from the Canvy team. We are wondering how communications will look like with the AR glasses available for our users…

 

Facebook, global internet acces, Canvy, Canvy Team, Aquila

Global Internet access – latest developments and summary from the Canvy Team

If you are passionate about all tech things, as we are here at Canvy, then you must be aware of Facebook’s attempts to provide global internet access.

 

What does global internet access mean?

Somewhere in January 2017 the planet became aware of its current overall digitization status. More precisely, a global overview powered by We are Social & Hootsuite revealed how more than 50 percent of the world’s population employs Internet connectivity on a regular basis. Or, as the more common expression goes, they are digitally connected.

How does this translate for you? Do you associate a wow moment to this piece of information, or are you slightly perplexed the numbers are not higher?

It probably depends on many factors, such as your location, the social positioning that defines you, your upbringing, your profession and so on. We would venture to say that – if you are reading our blog, you would rather be amazed the number is not higher.

Global internet access would mean a much higher internet connectivity rate – aiming over the 80 percent threshold. But is that possible?

 

Facebook and its quest for Internet connectivity everywhere

Since the big data proves the markets that provide Internet connectivity are way more packed in terms of users (obviously!), the leading tech companies whose global reach depends on ubiquitous connectivity have decided to take things in their hands.

There is a race for global Internet access going on – and it has brought a few things into question.

One of these highlights consists of the special shape taken by this “free Internet” that is in the works. There’s no such thing as a freebie, especially when the backstage involves expensive technology – therefore someone has to sponsor it, or make it profitable in a way. In order to do this, this free internet would be tributary to sponsors, meaning that only certain websites, tools or clusters of information would be available.

And here we go – hello, Internet neutrality dispute! There is an ongoing fight over the way  the Internet would in fact not be the same when made available globally in such a way. Some possible target areas for this type of connectivity have even thought of turning down the possible offer.

 

Social considerations juxtaposed over the need for Internet everywhere

Without global connectivity, there would be no global Internet. No global network, no universal standards, no IoT as the specialists have imagined it. A fragmented network could do, but it will come short of the ideal omni-network some have visualized and also, based their short to medium plans upon.

Due to the fact that social disparities not only plague societies vertically, but also horizontally, it may prove difficult to justify free Internet for some areas in view of their overall low budget, while in other areas the average financial plateau is acceptable, yet this average numbers mark extremes that make the reality different from the figures-based story.

In simpler terms, rural USA areas are as poorly connected as less developed states from the other side of the world are. Yet these rural areas are compensated by the nearby urban conglomerates’ connectivity, hence no free internet eligibility here, whereas less developed states might benefit from a sponsored form of Internet access.

Another issue, that we’ve mentioned above, is the “altered” state of this sponsored free internet connectivity. Check the toll-free data debate.

 

Recent developments – the Facebook drone

That being said – in a nutshell, the leading edge tech companies pursue their global internet connectivity projects – at least its experimental side.

Recently, Facebook’s solar-powered Internet connectivity provider drone, Aquila, successfully completed its test flight in Arizona.

The company intends on developing their drone in such a way that it could be able to fly for months in a row. In fact, the plan is to have a fleet of solar-powered airplanes provide digital connectivity to remote parts of the world.

While a lot of feasibility details have to do with ethics, rules & regulations, the tests proved auspicious. It surely looks like one day we might be able to travel even to the most isolated places, yet benefit from Internet connectivity. Whether it would be the same Internet we know from back home or not, that is – as we’ve seen, a whole different discussion.

 

Canvy Team, news, universal basic income, Zuckerberg

News to watch, by the Canvy Team: Mark Zuckerberg spoke out for the basic income

Perhaps you already read about this – Mark Zuckerberg voiced his support for the universal basic income, during his recent Harvard commencement address.

But what is the universal basic income? It is a form of social security and a concept rooted in historical sociology movements. According to this concept, each citizen should benefit from a regular and unconditional basic income, regardless of whether they work or not. This sum of money should cover the citizen’s basic needs, thus making sure each person is not a burden for society in the eventuality they cannot earn their living.

This leaves the question of who is supposed to provide the necessary funds, and where these money would come from. As in all social security systems, the answer consists in an algorithm combining various forms of taxation – specially aimed at enterprises.

 

Why universal basic income (UBI) – now?

As mentioned above, the universal basic income concept is in fact a social security scheme aiming at redistributing taxation money towards each citizen, in order to ensure a minimum living standard that would prevent major social disruptions due to the classical social security not being able to keep up with the modern society issues.

The moment of this idea’s revival has to do with progress and technology. There is an anticipated social impact associated to next-gen tech. Automation and robotics will take over an impressive number of jobs and occupations, and it seems like the calculations of possible outcomes are not extremely optimistic. There is no telling what will happen with those who will be out of jobs, or with those whose skills will not be needed anymore.

Since the main beneficiaries of the predicted digital revolution are the enterprises, various sociological and political thinkers wonder about acceptable ways of making companies responsible.  In their opinion, businesses should contribute in maintaining the social equilibrium, even when most of their workers would be digital. The people in this scenario would compete for the limited human-targeted jobs left – a competition not anyone would win. The states are worried what would happen in the eventuality that people supporting themselves would become a mathematical impossibility.

Therefore, the fact that the universal basic income is re-discussed now is at least in part motivated by what we expect out of the digital revolution – in terms of social and occupational consequences.

 

Is this concept right or wrong?

Besides being just an idea, proclaimed by individual voices, associations and organizations, the basic income concept crossed into social policy once it became a pilot project in certain states, and it went through a public referendum not long ago.

Finland launched a two-year basic income experiment in January 2017 – here you may find an account on how the project is going, taken 4 months into it. Their take on the concept is a bit different, making the “universal” attribute inapplicable.

Another ongoing project is located in California, via the Silicon Valley – Bloomberg calls the experiment an “unconditional cash transfer” trial, and the main worries apparently are not focused on the money issue, but more on the way this basic income status would affect the human dignity and behavior.

Talking about what people want, or think they want, in Switzerland the basic income concept got rejected via referendum in 2016.

 

Did Zuckerberg manage to raise approval for the basic income idea?

While strongly promoting the idea of a basic income guarantee, Mark Zuckerberg did attract an array of pro, as well as con comments that spread ripples through the online and offline media.

The opinions are split, ranging from “distorted view of the world” belonging to a CEO, through the virulent Washington Times article qualifying the idea as being a “brainless world tax” and ending up with a rather predominant neutral depiction of the already famous Zuckerberg Harvard address.

Surely we will meet the UBI concept in the future, seeing how it comes as an answer to a future global issue, whilst it also managed to catch the attention of important tech leaders.

canvy facebook f8 conference

What do you think about Facebook’s F8 statements? The Canvy Team summarized them for you

Facebook is one of the most important social media platforms, currently engaging 1.86 billion monthly active users. As you all know, it is one of the platforms integrated by Canvy, communications-wise. With our contact manager app Canvy, you can see your contacts’ Facebook account, and you can reach them via this channel, if active and set as preferred.

Therefore Facebook-related news is a matter of tangential interest for us. Recently (aka, on 18-19 April 2017), the company held its (quasi) annual F8 conference. The future plans unveiled this year in San Jose, California, sent ripples all through the tech world. Why is that?

Mind-controlled technology

As he confessed in 2016, Mark Zuckerberg wants to build a next-generation computer platform in which “people are the foundational element.” In view of this, his company uses R&D that should lead to valid prototypes of brain-computer experiences.

A while ago, Zuckerberg referred to AR and VR as appealing extensions of traditional human interactions. Yet Facebook’s Oculus VR venture got hit in 2016-2017 by a lawsuit where the court ruled in favor of their opponent, Zenimax. The $500 million in damages Facebook has to pay dampened a bit Zuckerberg’s VR enthusiasm. Add to this the fact that at the beginning of April 2017 the company is dragged into court via yet another Oculus-related lawsuit, the immediate future of Facebook VR is not looking so good.

However, the plans for brain-computer integration are not suspended, as the F8 discussions revealed. Apparently, a team of 60 engineers lodged in the Building 8 works on a technology that should allow us to type words on a computer by using just our minds.

Technology aims to materialize SF concepts

Although we are living in times of huge scientific and technological progress, many of us tend to still feel amazed by concepts like the ones of the Facebook F8 Conference. Typing words by using just our minds, hearing via the skin (for hearing-impaired persons), creating brain interfaces – all these are unsettling in a certain way, as TechCrunch puts it.

Perfecting such technology would break the inner-outer world barrier, in what the human mind is concerned. The optional character of giving up the privacy of our thoughts already is the big question for some. The F8 news reached various mass-media publications and became viral, and there are voices talking about tech-induced telepathy as a Facebook project.

Of course, all those familiarized with science know it’s a long and winding road from concept to prototype. Yet, it is also only logical for a company as big as Facebook to either understate the magnitude of its progress, in order to (relatively) keep it under the wraps, or to overstate it, as part of trying to raise brand interest.

Whichever the case, the recent unveilings surely managed to create quite a buzz.

How close are we to this utopian future of communications?

By utopian, we mean close to SF depictions, as we also hinted above. It all points towards an image of people employing technology to a high degree, while dropping the current hardware and UI. Imagine talking on your phone, without having to get it out of your pocket or sending a message by using just your thoughts. And, apparently, thought-sharing is not language-conditioned, so this kind of communications would go beyond cultural barriers as we know them today.

The head of Facebook’s experimental technologies division is Mrs. Regina Dugan, who previously led DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) as its 19th Director. She left in 2012 for Google, where she created and lead the Advanced Technology and Projects (ATAP) group. The ATAP generated Google’s Project Tango and Project Ara.

Now with the Building 8 research team, she hopes to reach the stage of having a brain sensor prototype ready within 18 months. This prototype should be able to type 100 words per minute, as instructed by human thought. Once marking this milestone, the company aims to mass-produce and sell the resulting sensor.