Posts Taged android

Canvy, Canvy Team, smartphones, Android Oreo

Android Oreo – what about the smartphones that are not scheduled to update

The fast-paced technology of our days may sometimes feel frustrating. We tend to form bonds with our possessions, especially when their daily use proves satisfactory. Therefore smartphones cross the boundary between indifferent objects and cherished goods. Many appreciate the new, improved devices, yet still hold on to their older ones – it’s an element of comfort. It may also be an action of wise financial considerations or sustainability.

Regardless of the reason, a lot of people desire to keep their current devices, yet would like to benefit from the latest software updates. Depending on the tech leaders’ policies, this may or may not be possible. What else is there to do, besides giving up your older smartphone and getting a new one just because you want the latest OS features and access to the newest apps?

 

Android Oreo and smartphone obsolescence

Unveiled on the 21st of August this year, the latest Android version was confirmed to arrive preinstalled on smartphones such as “BlackBerry, HTC, Nokia and Sony”, as GhizmoChina confirms (also see here the list of devices that get the new OS).

The logical assumption is that older smartphone versions will not get the Oreo update.

The same publication mentions that, however, those who really wish to have the latest Android version working on their current smartphones can employ custom ROMS and install Oreo. This “solution” is highly questionable, due to its instability and unofficial character – so if you are thinking of it, better move past it.

 

The hardware-software hybrid comes with its own rules

Whenever we acquire a “bundle” made out of hardware and software, we should understand that this type of property is not autonomous, especially in a world of connectivity. The benefits are many, but the rules are very specific ones we must abide to.

Perhaps the digital generations find it hard to even examine this issue in terms of autonomy versus dependency, but the services’ merging that we are witnessing do cause this type of interlocking for various elements, paid or free.

We buy a smartphone – it comes with a preinstalled OS that is part of our decision process when we decide to make this purchase. We install various apps, some of them free – in many instances because we want to connect and our friends and peers are reachable on those particular networks represented by the apps. Or we simply extend our abilities via the apps and we make our activities easier.

From the get go, the quality of digital user will suffer the impact of various factors.

 

Is the customer a false or a true king?

The idiom “the customer is always king” knows a radical transformation in the digital age. On the one hand, the companies do pay attention to the way users react to their product and services and analyze the market before every change – the slightest annoyance can snowball into a worldwide phenomenon or at least has the potential to impact a brand’s image. Therefore, risk management includes the customer reaction as one of the most important factors.

One the other hand, some changes need to go through, no matter what. As we know, innovations are rarely able to guarantee public approval before they launch – so they need to be introduced, they hold risks and often meet the audience’s hostility.

Of course, not everything comes in A/B tests. Some changes that seem to be pre-approved by the customers go wrong when standing the reality trial, while some innovations prove winners, regardless of the first impact.

The idea here would be that, when considering smartphones and the related software, be it their OS or their apps, any major change turns into a global roll out. When the change implies modifications that we do not like, unwanted updates, or even replacing our smartphones for compatibility – we hardly feel like kings.

 

Enjoy what you have

The good part is that old sayings never go out of business – and the ones about enjoying what you have are the golden rule when in doubt about changes that you are not sure of. Ponder your options – you have the time since usually there is a lag between the new and the old, in the sense that you are able to keep your old options/devices and not be completely out-networked for a while.

The same advice should go to the companies, as well. The truth is that customers appreciate not being pushed into unwanted options, or being left behind because they choose to do things differently. The ethics, the customer-friendliness and the customer loyalty are perhaps harder to quantify, but extremely valuable. When introducing innovations, it would be nice to let them exist along classical options, instead of annihilating these last ones. Just saying… at least when there is enough room for both to coexist.

Canvy, Android, OS, smartphones

How about the smartphones? The Canvy Team mashes up a couple of interesting news

Who said technology cannot be fun? Well, it wasn’t us, that’s for sure. While aiming for our Android contact manager app, Canvy, to be complex and reliable, we also took care to wrap it in a fun, colorful UI, with many customizable features.

Sometimes the device producers remember that addictive, fun tech features are critical – but they make debatable choices. It takes courage to add certain unusual features. It also takes some time for the verdict to come in from the audience.

HTC and the Edge Sense feature

The U 11 HTC flagship, coming to USA (via Spring) starting June 2017, introduces (or at least hopes to introduce) a new interactive feature called Edge Sense.

The online media (see The Verge, for example) quickly picked up on the feature, calling it the “squeeze”. What is it about? The users can flex the edges of the smartphone, in order to give certain commands. Pressure sensors in the metal sides transmit the input, while an on-screen cue appears once the feature is activated.

Does it sound like fun? The source we mentioned qualifies it as “a little unsettling at first”, and taking “some time getting used to”. Once the smartphone will reach the users, the actual experience will tell whether this novelty is a fiasco or a success.

Samsung and the Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus sales

According to ZDNet, the Korean company stated on Tuesday that 5 million items have been sold.

In only a month, the Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus proved to be well-received, and became available in 120 countries. The marketing machinery contributed to this success both previous to the launch, as well as during this last month. Carriers enabled hands-on trials for influencers and a lot of virtual ink flew on the exciting new features of these smartphones.

Android – iOS, the (still) ongoing competition

Both the smartphones above come with Android Operating Systems, as you may have – correctly – assumed.

While Android benefits from a growing popularity and from the wider access it has on many devices, the Apple’s proprietary iOS comes locked on the company’s devices. It should be a no-game, yet the cumulative smartphone market share shows a different picture. The Apple iPhone 7 is still the leading smartphone – globally.

As Boy Genius puts it, “the iPhone is still the world’s most popular smartphone”.

However, with the expected boom in the smartphone market in areas where Internet connectivity used to be low/medium, there is also a latent expectancy of more Android smartphones. While Facebook plans to provide free internet in Africa, the Chinese Alibaba contemplates the idea of doing the same in India.

There are a lot of discussions over the effects and hidden implications of such projects – but this is not our main focus here. What do you think is the answer to this question: “The smartphone adoption induced by free internet becoming reality will benefit which type of OS the most?”

We shall leave this question pending. Well, being an Android app, Canvy sure roots for this OS – but that’s between us and you.

Why Canvy?

Canvy offers an intuitive means to communicate by providing users with a centralized interface from where they can quickly reach their desired contacts via the best available channel. It aggregates information on which channels are likely to be most successful for contacting a user at a given time.

Discover the intuitive & colourful way to connect with your contacts. Stay mindful of everyone’s time and privacy. This post aims to provide a brief overview of the main benefits that come with using the Canvy app and diving into the colourful Canvy universe.

(1) Canvy’s adaptive screens boost productivity and ease of communication

Your native address book normally shows a list of all contacts. No order, no sorting algorithm. Canvy was designed as a tool which can predict its users’ moves and desires, in many ways like a personal assistant which knows us based on our own communication behaviour. Canvy thus changes the way contacts are displayed by offering users the possibility to choose from different screen displays based on their needs and communication context.

Three view modes are available – recently used contacts, interaction degree and adaptive.
Recently used – contacts are arranged based on the most recent communication with them. The list is chronologically sorted.
Interaction degree – is a view mode in which the contacts are listed based on the most interaction with them. So, more you interact with a contact, its position will rise inside “Home Screen”.
Adaptive – is a mix between “Recently used” and “Interaction degree”. Upper in the screen are displayed contacts with which the user communicated more combined with recently used contacts.

(2) All your preferred communication tools are one tap away

Canvy provides users with a centralized interface from where they can quickly reach their desired contacts via the best available channel. It aggregates information on which channels are likely to be most successful for contacting a user at a given time. It could be that during a meeting, a user is best likely reached via text message – or via a third-party messenger app such as Facebook, WhattsApp or Google Hangouts. Canvy brings all this information to your fingertips, enabling you to redefine personal communication and ensure that you communicate on your own terms.

(3) Privacy for real

Control which information goes public and which details are kept private. All data in Canvy is private and well-secured. We do not keep any information on our servers – data is stored locally on your device. We put users in control – they are aware at all times of what information is shared and with whom.