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The day the Internet held its breath…

We touched base with the Internet neutrality topic back in September, when we considered ISP blocking and what it means. We also mentioned the fight to keep the digital online space as we all know it on our Facebook page. Now all these are about to unravel, once the FCC vote takes place.

 

The global campaign against the vote that might bend net neutrality

The taglines read “it’s time to break the internet” – and influential groups and people call for resistance. Perhaps it seems hard to grasp the full importance of this step – yet those who know better are willing to explain it over and over again. Transforming the online space into a fragmented, multi-lane environment is bad. And once the precedent will be created, this will ripple into global effects. So yes, it concerns every net user in every corner of the world.

The Open Letter addressed to the U. S. Senate Subcommittee comprises a 43 page comment that details all the flaws in the upcoming action, as well as tries to deconstruct the false argumentation employed in supporting ISP manipulation, or, in other words, to present it as a thing that is already taking place, thus minimizing the effects of the impending vote.

“Don’t repeal net neutrality” and “you don’t understand how the Internet works” – here’s some of the most powerful allegations pertaining to the massive campaign that supports net neutrality. Striking mockup illustrations (as the one we captioned) try to make it clear to people how the Internet will look like if the act passes.

 

What can you do?

First, get informed in due time. You still have the liberty to do it – search for your preferred online authors and see what they have to say. Google the matter – browse articles, scan the arguments. Discuss what you discover, exchange ideas, become aware of what it’s going on and of the impact of these events.

In short, what could happen is that “the proposal would undo regulations that prohibit broadband and wireless companies from slowing or blocking access to the internet and banning them from charging internet companies fees to reach their customers faster than competitors”, as CNET explains it.

Secondly, check pages such as this, in order to see how you can help. Express your presence while it still matters.

Hoping to post again in an environment where the online looks the same, and it’s not shredded into multiple pieces with different regimens.

Canvy Facebook messenger for kids

Social media market enlargement – as reflected in Messenger for kids

We seem to be hearing a lot about technology use among seniors and/or social media for the elderly. Of course, this is just one side of the audience spectrum, while the other consists of the young(est) audience. Both segments are potential sources for a demographic market enlargement, as they provide constant technology and social media users, currently embedded in the overall audience.

Targeting these categories separately would surely be a profitable move – but is it also a common sense decision?

 

Quick case study of the Messenger for kids situation

The Facebook Messenger App for kids is designed for “kids 6-12 to connect with their family and friends, with parental controls to ensure they do so safely. It includes real-time video chat with AR effects for more fun!” – see more details here.

But why the fragmentation? Of course, as a contact management app, we may easily say that the more social media channels, the better. This means that people have an increasingly acute need to centralize various messages incoming on different channels, much to their exasperation. As long as the main channels are integrable at a policy level, as well as at a technical level, their fragmentation provides for the thriving of contact management apps.

However the question remains – why go for fragmentation, as a social media company? The messenger for kids seem to be packing in Snapchat-esque features and a hybrid type of parental control, where Facebook vouches for parental approved content circulating between the kids, yet the parents cannot see the chats. At least that’s what we gathered from a brief browsing of this topic.

The audience would consist of the kids that already use the full Messenger (doubtfully, since going for a lesser, more childish version is frankly a no-no), and the kids that would use the full Messenger, but aren’t allowed to. So it would be parent-approved, Facebook-supervised tool. The dream of every 6-12 child that yearns for digital communications.

 

How about the elderly?

Imagining a symmetrical move to the other side of the audience spectrum, the elderly should get their own Facebook or Messenger, where they could… I don’t know, exchange nostalgia messages, apply retro filters, play Bingo or have other “specific” activities.

Isn’t it weird how we stand united in separation? Why split the audience (besides dreams of, no, not of sugar plums, but of profit), and this after a century long experience that people do not like to do as they are told?

The elderly do, generally, have more time on their hands, compared to how their schedule looked like one or two decades ago. But they are also re-enjoying life as it is, with fresh air in the morning, with telling stories to their grandsons, with having tea with friends and real-time gossiping. In fact, they are a fickle audience when it comes to social media, because they might just be wiser and more real in their options than the younger adults are.

Welcoming them on social media could mean embedding extra options into the already-existing apps. Or, yet again, it may translate into a lot of fuss, market studies, extra apps or customized apps. Which one do you think it would be the best?

 

Market enlargement done right

Yes, there are audience segments that could use some extra attention and custom-tailored options.

Yes, by stimulating these people to be more active on social media, the specific market would most likely increase its dynamism and in fact would stand an “enlargement” process.

But adding extra apps in the already crowded digital landscape is counter-intuitive. Competitors have to stand together in the same niche, yet two and more apps from the same brand, due to, well, different targeting, is just too much.

Supplementary fragmentation leads to annoyance and confusion. Friends, business contacts, family and peers would be ultimately spread out among an indefinite number of social media applications, randomly open and shut, each one beaconing their notifications, each one difficult to configure, mute and so on.

Why not put users in control – for real? Allow the existing apps to be refined in a way that would meet specific needs. Kids – load preset configuration number 1! Elderly – load and customize preset configuration number 3!

Wonder if that is actually technically possible – but what isn’t, nowadays?

 

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AWS Summerian, contextualized in what smartphones tech is concerned

In a previous post, we mentioned that AR technology relates to next-gen mobile phones. Due to the fact that for these devices, VR technology is considered less suitable, the development of AR applications should be the key for future success.

In this context, Amazon’s cloud division (AWS) launched a new Amazon platform, the Amazon Summerian, supporting the rapid development of AR, VR, and 3D applications without the need for sophisticated coding skills. Available in a preview version, the new service is browser-based and benefits at this stage by a considerable push from the company, who wants to accelerate its adoption by the developers.

Integrated, easy-to-use tools should tip the market

Mass-coding is a dream many have when anticipating the future. Being able to have at hand an average employee that is basically skilled in coding, and pairing this type of professional with easy-to-use developer software could serve in a rapid implementation of various concepts at a global scale. Of course, this dream is also cost-saving, as well as perhaps a bit offensive from the point of view of an old school programmer.

Attempts of materializing this idea are already in motion – from introducing coding as a new language in the school’s curriculum, to making various coding apps available, so that kids are familiarized from an early age with this activity.

The other side of the coin consists of the easy-to-use tools designed for developers. When backed by tech leaders, these tools are bound to have a meaningful impact on the market.

High expectations, more exigent customers

 

Amazon, in order to present its product, conveyed the following statement to the public, through the voice of Marco Argenti, the Vice President of Technology at AWS: “With Amazon Sumerian, it is now possible for any developer to create a realistic, interactive VR or AR application in a few hours.”

This raises quite a few questions, related to the possible variables – does this estimate concern low-skilled or high-skilled developers? Is this an accurate expectation to create, or is it just a marketing move?

Some of these questions have answers, while for others, we still need neutral feedback. For example, the same FirstPost article mentions how the developers “need no specific experience in AR or VR programming”, but also that the company is “working on integrating third-party developers with the services to add more features”. So the platform is partly work-in-progress.

While the customers are increasingly demanding, the specific market includes an extended array of developer tools, as you may see here, some open source, others selling for quite reasonable prices, depending on the budget.

Trendsetters will be trendsetters

 

There’s nothing like good, powerful support coming from an established source that is willing to push a product on the market. All its qualities are underlined and turned into selling points, while the sore points are remedied or in view for remediation.

From this angle, a product coming from Amazon, Google (another company investing in the same area), Microsoft or others manage to equal similar, more competitive products, who do not benefit from the backup of the huge promotion/selling mechanisms these companies have. This market gap (more like a publicizing means gap) is supposedly here to stay, because it determines smaller developers to cooperate with the bigger companies more willingly, in order to join forces.

That is why even the small moves in the market, when coming from huge tech companies, are relevant. They help in anticipating future trends. Their small moves are doubled by ample investments, and these companies are likely to shift entire markets for their estimated ROI. Others may benefit, too, in the process. Customers most certainly benefit from the fierce competition – and so do the smaller companies that are clever enough to take the pulse of the market.

Canvy, Canvy Team, Black Friday

Black Friday – it’s coming and you should be prepared

Even though this annual event entitled Black Friday has already included in its tradition bad deals, too, we are mere people, after all. We are curious, we are in touch with all things tech, some of us enjoy shopping online, and others still appreciate a good brick-and-mortar display filled with gadgets.

The idea of being able to get a few things at a more advantageous price appeals to all humans. (Even to those who are against consumerism, or at least it makes them go through a rather difficult time when the mother of all deals is stepping into town…)

However, considering that the habit that began roughly around 1952 transformed over the decades, increasing its amplitude, but also giving way to scams or exaggeration, what is the right way to approach Black Friday, in order to benefit from it, rather than being crushed under its pressure?

 

A few wise questions to ask yourself

Before knocking down the door or typing down your card details into an online portal, best ask yourself a few questions such as:

  • Is this something you thought of buying during this last year?
  • Is the price worth buying, compared to the price tags you’ve seen the previous YEAR? (yes, year, since some stores actually raise the prices, then lower them in an artificial move just before BF)
  • Do you have all the accessories you need (if not, consider how much you will actually end up spending, accessories included – are you comfortable with that?)
  • Are you replacing an item or getting it for the first time? (for the more ethically – concerned, do you REALLY need to replace that item this year?)
  • Do you have the place to install the item? (not fun buying a big smart TV just because it’s a deal, only to find out it does not fit your room)
  • Are you up to getting all upset if you actually don’t get to buy this item before the stock runs out? (this too happens quite often, so do you want to go through all the trouble or would you rather drop the entire thing?)

 

Now, proceeding to more familiar (tech) considerations…

Although there yet another month until Christmas, you might well say “Bah Humbug” when reading our above section. We understand why, but when seeing pics of crazed people crowding over the sales, a few reasonable words don’t seem redundant.

So, knowing that we’ve warned you before, now let’s get to some of the most attractive BF deals – as online media announced them.

Here you may find a complete guide of this event, including what is BF, how did it all start, the announced 2017 dates, BF shopping tips (out of which we cannot but condone “research, research, research!” – beforehand), and so on.

Mashable also provides a foolproof guide to victoriously go through Black Friday.

For more targeted special offers, it suffices to search on Google. As for some of the name explanations, here are a few of them, as listed by Business Insider.

Wishing you happy (and wise) shopping, we do have a couple of good deals on our minds, of course – but we plan on approaching the entire thing with the tech – specific composure, as well as communicate with our friends (via Canvy, of course), so that we share the best offers and help each other when it comes to beating the first wave of BF rush!

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Where does “organic” stop and “sponsored” come in – a short Canvy Team review

As you may already be aware, Mozilla switched back to Google as the default search engine for Firefox in in the U.S., Canada, Hong Kong and Taiwan. The news implies that Google paid quite a considerable amount of money for this move, but it does not mention the exact value, since the “Google spokeswoman… declined to comment further”.

This is an example of how the things we take for granted when using digital tools are in fact mere results of deals, negotiations and big investments. So, what else is new, right? Not new, but rather the result of dwelling on the same idea: our satisfaction or annoyance related to all things tech-related is in fact attributable to such large scale moves. Of course, customers have their own options to make, but we only choose from the available “spread” – and what makes some variants available or not is in the hands of leading-edge tech companies, based on analytics and market considerations.

 

Organic versus sponsored/paid

The digital data we are exposed to is organic, unless labeled otherwise. However, even this commonly considered organic data may in fact have had to go through various funnels and the selection or boosting systems before reaching the average user, which makes it only partially organic.

To come back to the above news, when we employ a certain search engine, we take on all its predetermined terms and conditions. True, we get a lot of valuable free access to information, as well as other perks, in exchange for this. But those who are trying to reach us as users have to abide by the rules and conditions of the search engine – and sometimes their information fails to reach us. We don’t choose from a pool of infinite data, we only select from a bunch of preselected one. With all the AI algorithms, the selection itself got modified, to an extend that in fact it is not us who makes the choice, but an average individual located roughly in the same area as us, having approximately the same age, gender, preoccupations and so on.

Organic search results therefore are a myth. At the opposite end of the spectrum, we have the data labeled as promoted, paid for, sponsored etc. It’s the upfront marketing data, placed in an area where the smaller players in various fields compete for the attention of the oh-so-powerful-yet-many-times-unaware-of-its-importance-and-value, the (potential) customer.

 

Getting more comfortable in our role

As a formerly living in a rural area person who moved to the city becomes used to the point of being dependent to the modern urban commodities, the mighty world wide web users become more and more attached to great visuals, efficient services, fast query results and brand relevance. We have stopped questioning the “results” long ago – are they organic or are they paid for? The degree of gullibility just showed its amplitude in the fake news issue.

Is this a good or bad thing? Perhaps it isn’t even a duality question. However, it is a common sense principle that one shouldn’t completely rely on something barely understood. Right, but we do need everything digital every day, more and more – it’s a mass thing.

Even though we keep on using all the wonderful digital tools, both software and hardware included, being inquisitive and aware is a must. Let’s not get so comfortable, lest it will act against our own good.

Consider this: you go out and have a great meal with your friends, somewhere locally. You come back home and you search for the place online, eager to recommend it to someone. You forgot the name. It’s not the type of place that’s word of the mouth. You type, let’s say “pub great ribs wide variety beer”. And the results don’t point to the exact place you’re having in mind. Yet they do have a web page, and they have presented their offer properly on that page. What is going on? The entire labyrinth of moderated search is put in motion, but this specific business cannot reach you – it got lost somewhere in its entrails.

 

The bottom line

As a business, learn how to master the mechanisms that allow you to be visible to your audience and reach out to them.

As a customer/user never forget that often the digital environment serves you the most optimized results, not the organic results per se, nor necessarily what you really had in mind when you hit enter, or what is best suited for you, as a unique individual. Keep searching – combine offline with online and whenever needed, make your voice heard. Customer feedback matters even in cold, mathematical algorithms, and will count in decision making. We are still shaping the world as humans, we just have to be more on the ball as before.

CANVY, Facebook, messenger, payments, news

Social Media Communication, a significant new threshold, in the Canvy Team’s opinion

Digital communication evolved from standard, more formal means, towards friendly, viral tools. The “why” is rather a no-brainer. It did so because it followed the mass of people that crowded the most intuitive, friendly and progressive networks.

We are now experiencing communications that recreate in the cyber medium the vibe of face-to-face discussions, as much as possible. We send smileys, we generously impart GiFs, memes, photos, audio sequences and generally, we mimic real meetings with a combination of digital signs and feeling conveyors.

 

The next level of interactions is here

Social Media imitated real social interactions, bringing in gradually more tools of success in its attempt. But it all has a commercial underline, which is not contradictory to the first statement here, because society too has commercial nuances – some might even say highly intensive commercials tones, not just nuances.

Therefore Social Media opened up into messaging networks, which in turn opened up to peer-to-peer payments.

Say what and where – you might ask. “Payments in Messenger comes to France and the UK”, titles AndroidHeadlines.

The initiative is bound to be one of impact. In any case, it is very interesting to follow the developments, no matter that we root for it, or on the contrary, we would rather remain conservative in our payment options.

The feature is intended for friends transferring money to each other, but it might be just the first step. Depending on how this capability will be received, perhaps Facebook will extend it for other purposes, too.

You may find out more about the necessary steps and the security guarantees in the source article.

 

Monetization, comfort and emotions

It is only logical that many of the great digital tools count on users getting familiarized with their features, then becoming almost addicted to them, to a degree where even changes towards monetization don’t bother them.

Due to the fact that a certain such product proves useful and dependent, one would be willing to pay for extra features, or even for upgrading older features.

Facebook keeps many of its attractive features in the freebie zone, be its main social network or the more recent Messenger. Changes may revolt users, but they still remain enlisted. Of course, there also is such a thing as the straw that broke the camel’s back, but this network seems to be attentive enough to avoid it.

Instead, going with the flow, as you can see, the company decided to dip its toes into the payment market waters. Do you think this is a successful move or not?

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Boo! – a Canvy Team Halloween post

OK, so it’s time to dive into a few scary technologies, existing or emerging, and let the cold 1984-ish shivers run down the spines of our readers.

Ubiquitous tracking

Yeah, you may well look above your shoulder, with that creepy feeling that someone is spying on you. With the emerging tracking technology of today, you’re bound to become a VIP: location tracking meets surveillance cam, giving an entire extra dimension to the “keeping up appearances” saying. Of course, there is more than “meets the eye” – the presence & behavior are also analyzed, not just captured. Having a bad day? Better not kick any street bin around, spit on the pavement or drown your misery in shopping or in a bar – these have all the chances of becoming part of your pattern or portrait, in terms of tech tracking and identification.

No privacy for you!

This kind of derives from the first one, doesn’t it? Well, yes and no. That is, it covers an entirely new area. With the smart houses of the (not so distant) future, data on your sleeping, eating and other habits will be fed to, well, practically, to you-don’t-know-what, since nothing is hacker-proof. You may be agreeing to this process out of handiness, as in, “I’ll let my fridge tell me when it’s time to order milk’, and end up in some dark internet scheme. It’s one of the risks… Ah, and in case you don’t know it yet, there are online services offering to spy on your SO by means of hacking into the smartphone and other tech networks that might provide insights on what a person is doing, with whom and where.

No opt-out from the things above

Read yesterday how an airport technology provides faster access for those who agree to have their face and retina scanned. Since this tech is in its early stages, it’s opt-in, but when the alternative presumes waiting in line until you get bored, there isn’t much mystery on what the average person will choose, right? And how about mandatory enrollment for every citizen of a state in a biometric database? It’s already happening, and it may soon be “coming to a location near you”. Stop fixing your hair and start worrying whether the AI will identify any menacing traits in the way your forehead is configured… oops, excuse the exaggeration, but this is a Halloween-y post, so just bear with us.

Feeling a bit spooked out?

You’d better drop the anxiety, because it’s bad for your health. And the future projections include robot doctors. You might not be (yet) prepared to relinquish your fate to some sort of cyber hands. What if the power is cut off? What if the machine goes berserk and starts preparing the planet for the rise of the machines – with you?!

Having medicine delivered inside your body by tiny nanobots isn’t far from scaring the daylights out of you. What are these tiny things doing, besides getting the treatment to the targeted cells? What happens when they are done, is any of them staying behind and starting to consider your body as a host? How about programmed nanobots that activate when the patient triggers them via certain behaviors & parameters, like nervousness or sweating. Sssh – just be nice and maybe they will leave you alone!

…Perhaps the future generations will save us!

Oh, well, who knows what a genetically engineered kid will think of these matters, and of us altoghether. When removing the weak or “bad” traits in the process, the CRISPR scientists might as well increasingly remove humanity. It takes quite a process to understand and accept human failures, and empathy is not found at every corner. Even less on every genetically-engineered corner. Will these alleged superhuman be able to accept their predecessors as such, or will become son kind of inferior species?

Shall we go on?

We thought of saving other tech spooks for the next Halloween. Enough is enough, right? Or you might go on with your own research on AI, driverless cars, brain scanning, cyber implants, and other potential wonders with a dangerous edge.

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Canvy Team – trending now, a few thoughts

Hello there! Each time we feel like knowing what are the moment’s trends, we go here, because, hey, Google is the king of all Earthly digital searches, isn’t it?

 

Today’s trending topics

As it so happens, the most successful topic at the moment we checked was actually a very good piece of news, because it showed that wow! – people still read. And there are a lot of them. All crowding the website that Cambridge University posted Stephen Hawking’s doctoral thesis, entitled “Properties of Expanding Universes.” The scientist wrote his thesis back when he “was a 24-year-old graduate student in 1965”, but I guess we’ll have to wait a bit more for us to read it.

Moving on, we find one video game topic, as usual. Each time when we checked the trends, there was at least one of this kind high up in the list. This time, as you may already know, the rumors are that Nintendo’s Animal Crossing is coming on mobile, with fans being partly enthusiastic , partly worried, as you may see on Games Radar.

The third place also belongs to games, whose “riveting launch trailer” enthralls its fans. Also, you may find out more in one of the source article, this time on Windows Central.

 

Trending tech news

Just below the podium, tech meets gaming with revelations concerning the Xbox One. Halo 3, The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion, Fallout 3 and Assassin’s Creed will all be enhanced Xbox One X, which will be available starting November 7.

The following topic of interest belongs to the cloud games: Microsoft partners with the supercomputer manufacturer, Cray, in order to serve the Azure data centers. This move “gives customers the cloud-based supercomputing capabilities they need to increase their competitive advantage”, as the Cray CEO, Peter Ungaro puts it.

How about Super Mario Odyssey – the open-world, 3D Mario game? It’s also trending, and I bet there are plenty of enthusiasts out there just waiting for its release. Nintendo unveiled a trailer, whose images are fascinating, and which, of course, got analyzed in detail, as you may see yourself here, for example.

 

A particularly interesting trendy topic

 Of course, all game changers (or game enhancements) in what the Android phones are concerned are of a special interest for us, here at Canvy. Therefore, seeing how Huawei and Samsung were reported to go head-to-head in the foldable phone of the close future, we got a pretty juicy subject for our morning office talks. The foldable phone has been talked about for some years now, and with the increasing size in flagships, it may (at least in theory) combine the large screen appeal with a comfortable way of pocketing your beloved gadgets. However, seeing how the source article includes the cooling down reply “the technology isn’t quite there yet”, coming from Huawei, and contemplating what head-to-head means, I guess the tech companies are just roasting their customers a bit more on this line of development, while being yet far from accomplishing it.

 

Closure with Adobe, or not…

Since the 8th trending topic is somehow of a down-wise matter, it serves well for closure. Adobe is fighting for survival and throws a few AI applications in this, as you may see here. But Fstoppers compares prices and raises the question of whether it is time to ditch Adobe (or not). As mentioned, an invisible down-pointing arrow marks this trending topic – just consider this post’s conclusion to get the vibe: “more than the price, the performance and instability problems of Adobe may be a reason to look elsewhere”

Without feeling at all burdened by this Adobe dilemma, we move on through our week of marketing, developing, graphic designing, testing and being a successful team, eager to see how the trending topics will unfold through the next seven days – wishing you all a great week, too!

Canvy, Canvy Team, technology, Android contact manager,

Missing the old-school vibe? You can still spice up your life with it

Missing the old-school vibe? You can still spice up your life with it

A big hello this week from the Canvy Team! Do you have a Canvy contact that chose a black-and-white pic for his account? If you have, then think of him/her for the old-school vibe, and if you haven’t, just imagine it.

This guided our weekly net surfing session – amidst the great digital disruption, there are businesses that thrive in their own way, keeping their services behind the times. Or, if you like, outside the mainstream times, as we know them.

 

Retro companies – cool by default

While many products and offers fade into a mass of resemblance, due to competing for similar USPs, this is definitely not true in what the following selection of brands is concerned. Courtesy of Oddee.com, we browsed through a list of a list of “companies that time forgot”.

How about playing a cassette tape? With what, you may ask. Considering that the National Audio Company (NAC) from Springfield, MO annually produces and sells around… a few million items (10 million in 2014, to be more precise), there are people who definitely still possess the necessary gadgets to play cassettes. You may check the NAC website here, because yeah, they also have a digital presence. Did you think they only advertised via flyers and megaphone!?

Another company sells “pre-assembled DeLoreans starting at $57,500”. If intrigued, their online history is available for all those interested. The company has over five locations all over the US.

Now, if you feel nostalgic, all you have to do is move to the Boston area and have your fresh milk delivered at home by the vintage brand Thatcher Farm, or even become one of their employees. This company, much like the previous two, features a simple website, with all the essential data crammed in a few simple static pages.

What makes these companies cool is that they are indeed one of a kind, and they either survive comfortably or even thrive.

 

From companies to clients – some out-of-timely products

Again, we are not considering products that are ahead of their time, but those who are out of time. Of course, they were branded “hipster-tech”, due to the fact these products are also pointless. However, they are endearing and make you think “wow”. They risk of making you want to own one exemplary, too. Therefore – case closed. These are viable products, and the companies that manufacture & sell them probably do not risk much competition, either.

What are some of these products? The laser keyboard – OK, OK, that is a bit progressive. (But we also have the wooden keyboard in another online selection, so you can back off). A device that “turns your iPhone 6 into an old-school 4K shooter”, and a pocket-size coffee brewer top off this rather short list.

Jumping right into the other selection we found, what do you think of a contemporaneous instant photo printer? The guys from Fujifilm estimated they will have enough appreciative customers for its production to be worth it. How about a levitating speaker? Now, this is progressive. If you think it’s scary at some point, just smack it with your bamboo keyboard and you are all set – back into the present!

 

The right products & the right strategy for the right customers

What the above companies did, voluntarily or by chance (sorry to all the strategists out there, but the “by chance” eventuality is one we must take into account), is finding their niche. There are an increasing number of people who simply don’t enjoy the mainstream clichés. (Don’t be too optimistic now, it probably is considerably lower than the number of people who enjoy them, but hey – it’s enough to provide the customer base for these businesses.)

The secret is to find this “right place” on the market – and add passion into serving your customers. Tech can be fun, and beautiful, and cherish nostalgia at the same time.

Canvy Canvy Team tech news fun lol

Smile – it’s this weeks’ news mash up from the Canvy Team

This week the Canvy Team scoured the net for a few fun, tech-related news. (Seems like people are getting terrible serious of late about their grown up “toys”… Yes, we know that smartphones and devices are indeed useful in productivity, but let’s admit we all foster at least one game on these gadgets, so more or less secretly, they also are our toys – right?)

So, let’s see the findings…

 

The best office perks

In the spirit of steering away gradually from the work-productivity zone, here’s a great list of amazing amenities, some organizations provide their employees with. You will find from Google pods to maternity concierge services, indoor sports areas and other recreational spaces.

Although this list might make you feel a bit sad if you don’t have your own perks at the office, you may well take it lightly – there is still hope! Knowing how trends work, such attractive features are bound to reach your own work environment… someday.

 

Funny job titles in techworld

How about working as a digital overlord? Perhaps you already do and don’t know it, because that’s the title one company used for Website Managers. Also, plenty of Gurus, Ninjas, and Rockstars, Masters, Evangelists and Sherpas seem to populate the wondrous world of tech. There are even a few Prophets out there, or to be honest at least one, which works “across the globe to identify new opportunities for the business.”

Feast your curiosity and open your horizon by browsing this list here.

 

Next level CVs

This one you surely know about! Have you heard of the guy who Lego-ed himself in order to get better noticed in his job hunt?

You can find out more about this clever guy here. Or just Google him, and make him even more viral – his name is Andy Morris, and he’s a design school grad.

Here’s me, as a figurine… don’t throw out the packaging, there’s my CV there! Nothing more to see here, just move on to…

 

Your cat is controlling your TV

Oh, well, now that Internet streaming is usurping TV as we used to know it, of course your cat is playing with your old TV set in the basement… only that’s not the case here.

It’s all about the TV-remote wars, a society game played in every family of more than one member. We’ve played it with our friends, siblings and relatives. But I bet we’ve never thought of turning them into a remote. Or the cat. Or any other object in the house.

Wait for it… Yes, here it comes: “researchers at the University of Lancaster have developed a system that will let any object in your house become a TV remote – even your sleepy cat”.

Featured here by TechRadar, this odd piece of news, of course, can remain just a “would be”, since it will be a while until its consumer product stage. Nevertheless, we can dream on. I imagine the cats aren’t holding their breath for this innovation to reach the market.

 

That’s all, folks. Have a nice week!