Posts on Mar 2018

Canvy smartphones cognitive abilities management addictive

Why managing our phones now means not having to part with it later

In high school, we had a teacher who once almost had a nervous breakdown in class. The reason consisted of the fact that we did not pay attention, at all, to what she was saying. In her own words, not paying attention was worse that misbehaving or being noisy. While we weren’t disturbing the class, she noticed that our minds kept being elsewhere, on a regular basis.

I don’t remember what our preoccupation was back then, but today, we would surely be thinking of something related to our phones – a message, a photo, the latest updates from one of our contacts or the videogame we like with those virtual chores that we must perform at regular times.


Smartphones finally get accurate studies…

…in what their desensitization effect is concerned, that is. While extremely profitable for the tech producers, as well as for the marketers and the commercial entities that found a new way of reaching out to customers whenever, wherever, their effect on people’s cognitive abilities is bad, apparently.

Since profitability is the key factor that drives competent studies, we may well assume a few things. First, the situation is serious and thoroughly researched. Secondly, the degree it affects budgets must be high. Weighing the pros and cons resulting from this situation, the tech industry took the preliminary steps. Educating smartphone users would be the first step. The message comes through pretty clear – mind the way you use your phones.

Not managing our smartphones properly means not being in control. This in turn pairs up with being less attentive, less intelligent and less productive.


Do we have to actually be on the phone for it to affect us?

As this article from HBR that prompted this topic shows, people don’t actually have to use their phone actively to perform less in cognitive activities.

The strength of the connection people have with their phones is the factor that makes the difference. Those who have developed a dependency are affected even by the presence of their phones in the pocket.

This does not make smartphones evil – it simply draws the attention to a fact that we need to take into considerations. Our phones have become points of attraction, and their lure is stronger when unacknowledged. Once realizing that we have a problem, it’s up to us to find solutions.

Depending on just how serious this issue is – in numbers and metrics – we can expect to see other warnings, or even future public campaigns teaching people how to put their phones away, when needing to focus.


Entrepreneur also based a feature on the study backing up the HBR article.

Canvy Mi TV 4

Mainstream and lower-end technology – do they compete for the same market share?

As the market of smartphones illustrates, the offer is wide enough for every pocket to find a suited device. From high-end phones, an area where Apple competes with Samsung, to low-end cheap devices, which are still able to provide Internet connectivity and support the most popular apps, there’s plenty to choose from.

In a similar way, other tech gadgets find their state-of-the-art expensive materialization, their mid-range one, as well as the low-end affordable counterparts.


How is the market allotted – do big incomes pair up with expensive tech, or the pattern is less obvious?

Of course, a pertinent answer to this question is only possible when based on recent, consistent market studies. But how about induction? Each of us can pay attention around and notice who owns which brand of technology, and how often do they renew their devices.

The results may differ from country to country, even the regional culture influences such behaviors. Of course, there are exceptions anywhere – but the average person tends to follow the immediate trends.

For example, there are a lot of people who do not have their own income (youngsters) or people with a low income that are brand fanatics. You may notice such people featuring the latest iPhone model, or at least sticking with a well-known brand. The middle segment would most likely be constituted out of medium-income people who choose to go with a well-known brand due to the implied guarantee of quality, but keep the same device until it expires, being uninterested in going for the latest model.

This segment must be pretty consistent, since the big tech companies are tapping into it with the strategy of ceasing support for older versions, or promoting software that only works on more recent models.


The gap between assumptions and reality in tech

As mentioned, only a truly professional market report can pretend to reflect the actual reality of what is going on. Pretend – since there is a degree of accuracy involved in each study, which leaves behind a degree of inaccuracy. The media often forgets this detail when going for attention-grabbing titles, and employs firm, one hundred percent word.

There are also scientific studies on social effects – viral phenomenon, critical mass, influencers… These familiar words do characterize precise, quantifiable social moves. Researchers specialize in predicting them, and more recently, AI & Machine Learning play an important role in forecasting tendencies that affect businesses.

The reality, however, does look a bit different. Your grandma might be using your old phone, or your kids may chat or play games on your business phone when at home. The full featured user is in fact an enigma – and some say it’d better remain as such, to a certain degree.

Meanwhile, the low-price tech catches up with the high-end players

Testing is the mother of truthfulness, in tech. We didn’t get the chance to test the new Mi Smart LED TV 4 (Mi TV 4), but it seems it is a hit in India at the moment. This fact is plausible, as all revolutionary technologies started by being extremely expensive, then reached affordable costs. Being able to deliver excellence at a reasonable price is part of the technological race since forever.

As long as those who launch such products are honest and do not create then crush false expectations in their clients, the process is more than welcome. We may still have dreams of well-known brands, but sooner or later we’ll notice a friend that perhaps has the same benefits from his less-known brand device as the owners of high-end brands have – and this will get us thinking…