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Is the smartest design inconspicuous? Intel seems to think so

You must have surely heard by now of the smart glasses’ odyssey. The wearable computer glasses have gone through a few versions – and the issue of comfort shared an equal part with the tech issue, in what keeping the product from mass commercialization is concerned.

The most well-known attempt comes from Google. The Google Glass went through several proofs of concept (PoC), then it became the Aura Project, aiming niche markets (healthcare, corporate). It gradually faded out of the limelight.

The entire experience prompted out that unusual, uncomfortable head gear cannot lead to success. VR headsets represent a similar case.

 

Intel’s attempt to turn the tables

Intel decided to avoid making the same mistakes as mentioned above. Their smart glasses look inconspicuous, according to online media reports. The prototype is called Vaunt, and allegedly mimics the usual pair of plastic glasses one may find at any optometrist.

The Vaunt can reflect holographic images on the user’s retina, include Bluetooth connectivity, and are able to send discreet notifications to their user. The matter of contextual, integrated notification is one focal point of this new piece of technology, whilst the software that backs it up remains a secret for the moment.

While Slate underlines the possible connection between Intel’s negative chipset security flaws attention and this new gadget – as in suggesting that the company may have used this project to distract people from the less flattering question of flawed chipsets, the product is nevertheless interesting.

Regardless of whether Intel will decide to commercialize the Vault or not, it sure has set a precedent.

 

What if the bold new technology were inconspicuous?

Let’s imagine the tech gear of the future looking just as our current objects look like, only having an advanced tech twist hidden beneath a normal looking surface.

This would surely be another way to go, in opposition with in-your-eyes technology, making a loud statement that it should prevail in our lives.

An IoT-connected, highly automatized household could, for example, look just like any other house, unraveling its technological potential only per request.

We could integrate efficient technology in a completely environment-friendly landscape, aiming for health, visually-pleasing greenery and sustainability.

Of course, the degree of maturity involved in taking such an approach is way higher than the actual stage of societal progress seems to involve. But we can always remain optimistic.

If by the time we’ve grown out of the tech-enthusiasts’ adolescence we are basking in, there will be enough of a planet for us to steer back towards an eco-compatible environment, inconspicuous technology might be the only way to go.

In the meantime, you may take a look at the Vaunt, on this Verge hands-on video: