Posts on Dec 2017

net neutrality FCC vote Canvy contact app news

The day the Internet held its breath…

We touched base with the Internet neutrality topic back in September, when we considered ISP blocking and what it means. We also mentioned the fight to keep the digital online space as we all know it on our Facebook page. Now all these are about to unravel, once the FCC vote takes place.

 

The global campaign against the vote that might bend net neutrality

The taglines read “it’s time to break the internet” – and influential groups and people call for resistance. Perhaps it seems hard to grasp the full importance of this step – yet those who know better are willing to explain it over and over again. Transforming the online space into a fragmented, multi-lane environment is bad. And once the precedent will be created, this will ripple into global effects. So yes, it concerns every net user in every corner of the world.

The Open Letter addressed to the U. S. Senate Subcommittee comprises a 43 page comment that details all the flaws in the upcoming action, as well as tries to deconstruct the false argumentation employed in supporting ISP manipulation, or, in other words, to present it as a thing that is already taking place, thus minimizing the effects of the impending vote.

“Don’t repeal net neutrality” and “you don’t understand how the Internet works” – here’s some of the most powerful allegations pertaining to the massive campaign that supports net neutrality. Striking mockup illustrations (as the one we captioned) try to make it clear to people how the Internet will look like if the act passes.

 

What can you do?

First, get informed in due time. You still have the liberty to do it – search for your preferred online authors and see what they have to say. Google the matter – browse articles, scan the arguments. Discuss what you discover, exchange ideas, become aware of what it’s going on and of the impact of these events.

In short, what could happen is that “the proposal would undo regulations that prohibit broadband and wireless companies from slowing or blocking access to the internet and banning them from charging internet companies fees to reach their customers faster than competitors”, as CNET explains it.

Secondly, check pages such as this, in order to see how you can help. Express your presence while it still matters.

Hoping to post again in an environment where the online looks the same, and it’s not shredded into multiple pieces with different regimens.

Canvy Facebook messenger for kids

Social media market enlargement – as reflected in Messenger for kids

We seem to be hearing a lot about technology use among seniors and/or social media for the elderly. Of course, this is just one side of the audience spectrum, while the other consists of the young(est) audience. Both segments are potential sources for a demographic market enlargement, as they provide constant technology and social media users, currently embedded in the overall audience.

Targeting these categories separately would surely be a profitable move – but is it also a common sense decision?

 

Quick case study of the Messenger for kids situation

The Facebook Messenger App for kids is designed for “kids 6-12 to connect with their family and friends, with parental controls to ensure they do so safely. It includes real-time video chat with AR effects for more fun!” – see more details here.

But why the fragmentation? Of course, as a contact management app, we may easily say that the more social media channels, the better. This means that people have an increasingly acute need to centralize various messages incoming on different channels, much to their exasperation. As long as the main channels are integrable at a policy level, as well as at a technical level, their fragmentation provides for the thriving of contact management apps.

However the question remains – why go for fragmentation, as a social media company? The messenger for kids seem to be packing in Snapchat-esque features and a hybrid type of parental control, where Facebook vouches for parental approved content circulating between the kids, yet the parents cannot see the chats. At least that’s what we gathered from a brief browsing of this topic.

The audience would consist of the kids that already use the full Messenger (doubtfully, since going for a lesser, more childish version is frankly a no-no), and the kids that would use the full Messenger, but aren’t allowed to. So it would be parent-approved, Facebook-supervised tool. The dream of every 6-12 child that yearns for digital communications.

 

How about the elderly?

Imagining a symmetrical move to the other side of the audience spectrum, the elderly should get their own Facebook or Messenger, where they could… I don’t know, exchange nostalgia messages, apply retro filters, play Bingo or have other “specific” activities.

Isn’t it weird how we stand united in separation? Why split the audience (besides dreams of, no, not of sugar plums, but of profit), and this after a century long experience that people do not like to do as they are told?

The elderly do, generally, have more time on their hands, compared to how their schedule looked like one or two decades ago. But they are also re-enjoying life as it is, with fresh air in the morning, with telling stories to their grandsons, with having tea with friends and real-time gossiping. In fact, they are a fickle audience when it comes to social media, because they might just be wiser and more real in their options than the younger adults are.

Welcoming them on social media could mean embedding extra options into the already-existing apps. Or, yet again, it may translate into a lot of fuss, market studies, extra apps or customized apps. Which one do you think it would be the best?

 

Market enlargement done right

Yes, there are audience segments that could use some extra attention and custom-tailored options.

Yes, by stimulating these people to be more active on social media, the specific market would most likely increase its dynamism and in fact would stand an “enlargement” process.

But adding extra apps in the already crowded digital landscape is counter-intuitive. Competitors have to stand together in the same niche, yet two and more apps from the same brand, due to, well, different targeting, is just too much.

Supplementary fragmentation leads to annoyance and confusion. Friends, business contacts, family and peers would be ultimately spread out among an indefinite number of social media applications, randomly open and shut, each one beaconing their notifications, each one difficult to configure, mute and so on.

Why not put users in control – for real? Allow the existing apps to be refined in a way that would meet specific needs. Kids – load preset configuration number 1! Elderly – load and customize preset configuration number 3!

Wonder if that is actually technically possible – but what isn’t, nowadays?